Yom HaZikaron - Yosef Guedalia hy"d

Episode 7 May 07, 2024 01:39:58
Yom HaZikaron - Yosef Guedalia hy"d
The Koren Podcast
Yom HaZikaron - Yosef Guedalia hy"d

May 07 2024 | 01:39:58

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Show Notes

In this deeply moving episode of the Koren Podcast, Al Regel Ahat, we have the honor of sitting down with David, Asher, and Charlie Guedalia, as they share the remarkable story of their beloved son and brother, Yosef.

Yosef's name has become synonymous with courage, sacrifice, and heroism. On that fateful day in Kfar Aza, Yosef fearlessly put himself in harm's way to save the lives of countless others. His selfless act of bravery serves as a shining example of the unwavering spirit of the Jewish people.

As we approach Yom HaZikaron, a time of solemn reflection and remembrance, Yosef's memory burns brightly in our hearts. His legacy reminds us of the profound depths of love and sacrifice that define our nation.

Throughout the episode, David, Asher, and Charlie share intimate stories of Yosef's life, his unwavering commitment to his family, to Judaism and learning Torah, and to his beloved wife Sinai. Their heartfelt words paint a poignant picture of a true hero, whose spirit continues to inspire and uplift us all.

Join us as we honor the memory of Yosef Geudalia, a beacon of light in the darkness, and celebrate the remarkable legacy he leaves behind.

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The Koren Podcast was written and hosted by Aryeh Grossman and Alex Drucker and was edited and produced by Alex Drucker. Artwork by Tani Bayer. Music by Music Unlimited via pixabay.com

The Koren Podcast is part of the Koren Podcast Network, a division of Koren Jerusalem.

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Episode Transcript

[00:00:01] Speaker A: What are the challenges we personally faced which embodies this push me pull you from the national tragedy to the private tragedy? What Charlie's describing is that Josef lived at both levels seamlessly. They're hard to communicate what it looks like to have somebody in your house who doesn't really have that private space thing going for him. He's really just one of my clear memories of him on Shabbat is Shabbos afternoon. He refused to take a nap. He was like, he didn't sleep all week, literally, because he was busy saving lives. And then Shabbos afternoon, he and his wife would sit on the couch. He would learn from, we learn Masachet Shabbat, and just the two of them sitting next to each other on the couch and just being together was a very, just a beautiful thing to say. [00:00:54] Speaker B: Welcome back to another episode of the current podcast. This, as so many episodes are, is an incredibly special and important one. We recorded this episode back in February of this year, but as you will understand as you listen to our conversation, the most appropriate thing to do would be to release this episode for Yom Hazikaron. Sitting here in Israel and approaching Yom Hazikaram, when we remember all the people who have given their lives in the defense of the state of Israel or in other incidents over our history, this year in particular, we all have at the forefront of our minds the fact that there are so many more people this year as a result of events over the last several months. We were incredibly honored to be able to sit down with the family of Josef Gedalia. With so many more names to add to the list and so many more stories to remember, it's incredibly fitting we were able to sit down with the family of just one of the people whose name has been added to that list this year, Yosef Gedalia, who was killed on Torah on October 7. [00:02:12] Speaker C: Our connection at Coren to Yosef and his family came about a few months ago when one of our colleagues, Abhisheima Gensa, who has been serving on Milawym since October 7, was approached by someone who he was with in reserve duty about whether Corinne could help with a new Hamash Rashi learning program that had been set up by the friends of Yosef Gadalia to learn every week the parashat with Rush's commentary in Yosef's memory. That friend Ian Schwartz is going to actually join us on this episode. Tell us a little bit more about the project, and before we hear from Yosef's family about his life as well, so really pleased to be joined by Ian Schwartz, who we've been working and the pleasure of working with over the past few months on a really important project, Chomash Rashi project in memory of Yosef Gedalia, who we're going to be hearing about more on today's episode. Ian, can you tell us a little bit about yourself and a little bit about the project? [00:03:11] Speaker D: Yeah. So my name is Ian Schwartz. I'm 25. I teach and learn in Ishibura, Koto and Isha Torah, originally from Philadelphia, made aliyah when I was 18, right after high school. And in terms of the project. So I've known Sinai, Yosef's wife, for, I guess, five years from. After my year in Israel, I spent the summer learning in the bait Midrash program, Camp Moshe. And my now wife, her co counselor was Sinai. And her friendship started there. And then the following year, Sinai was learning new Jharova. So I'd seen it see her around the Rova as I was learning in Shivarak hotel Shanabet. And she got married to Yosef, and they lived in the area in Baca. We were friends. We had meals together. I would see him pretty often just around the community. And that was really my friendship with Josef. We were friends, but he was honestly someone that you saw sometimes, but you would see him Friday night, you wouldn't necessarily shot this morning. Because of his involvement in Devon in the elite unit, he never knew where he was going to be from night to night. He could be from one mission to the next. So we kind of thought like, okay, this is the person I sometimes get to see, this amazing person. You could tell, but, you know, unfortunately, because so much of his life was not unfortunately, but fortunately and unfortunately, I guess, because so much of his life was dedicated to the army, you know, we never really, I guess, had the opportunity to, like, really deepen that friendship. But it was something we both knew that we wanted, as Sinai has told me also. So we were friends, but I wouldn't say we're the closest friends in the world. So after we got the news the week of October 7, it wasn't day of, but I think it was Monday night or Tuesday night. I don't remember exactly. Someone texted me before my wife found out because they were afraid to tell my wife because they just couldn't handle telling her the news and that Yosef had been, you know, died fighting on October 7 on some pastoral. It was shock. You know, I grew up and I myself served in the IDF. I was now for four months in Milewin, but I didn't know anybody firsthand that had been killed. There were a lot of people that I was inspired by, but it wasn't a first person that I really knew. I really actually understood and talked to. And then all of a sudden, they were gone. So there's a sense of shock. And then we attended the funeral, and it was just surreal just to hear her, you know, hes fed for him and understanding that shes now a widow and shes 22, 23 years old. Shes her friend. What does that mean? And whats going on? Is this a complete reality that no one can really understood what to do about it and was sitting at the Shiva and been to, you know, shivas before, but this one was obviously very different. And, you know, no one knew what to do, you know, how to do, because different when it's a person, you know, an older person mourning their parent or a grandparent, but when it's a person that's your age, you know, mourning their spouse, it's something that none of us or nobody can really be equipped for in such a sudden, dramatic way. But there's a teaching of soloveitchik. He talks about Nicol du di Dufek, that when a tragedy happens, jewish people don't ask the question of why. They ask the question of how, because why someone dies or why someone is killed or why a bad thing happens is not a question you can really ever expect the answer to. Moshe Rabbeinu didn't have the answer to that question. That's beyond their understanding. But how? What am I supposed to do? How am I supposed to respond? That's a question that a jew is supposed to ask. So in that moment, you know, I thought, what are we going to do about this? Like, how are we going to respond? And I asked Sinai at the Shiva, what can we do for Yosef? What can we learn for him? Because I knew, despite his intense army service and also being married and also everything else that he was involved in, he always made time for Tal Matora. He was kuvetim every single day. So I asked, what can we learn from him? And she said two things. The first one was Einaya, which is Cook's commentary on the agadot in mastach of Shabbat, and Masech Ibrah, which is an incredible work, but it's a little bit harder to get a lot of people to learn that by nature of the work itself, even though maybe that's the next project, but I don't think so. And the second thing was a fundamental mitzvah. There's no other mitzvah. Daf Yomi is not a mitzvah. There's no other mitzvah that we have in the realm of Tamra Torah. Something you have to learn every single week, something you have to be involved in every single day besides learning parashat shivua with either uncle Sarashi or another commentary. And every week, no matter what missions he was involved in, no matter where he was going and how much he was sleeping, he always finished the parsha, which is an incredibly inspiring thing. And for many people, this is a really difficult mitzvah to do. It's Simon in the shochana Reish be. Hey. So people make the almost joke that it's right. Reish pehei is Rafe is weak. [00:08:22] Speaker E: Is that it's like. [00:08:22] Speaker D: Almost like a hard mitzvah to do because you have so much things you want to learn, you have so much other things going on. So people kind of overlook this mitzvah, and they don't always accomplish mitigation, accomplish it, or they don't always accomplish it properly. So that's, like, the challenge. But the inspiration of Yosef said, okay, so we have to do this. We have to make it. So started with the WhatsApp group, and it's a very simple idea. Learn Shnemikra for Yosef in his memory. If he was able to do it despite everything that he was doing for Kalisa, then everyone living their normal lives with less intensity is able to find 510, 15 minutes a day to learn the parsha and just understand the parsha on a simple level. And started with a WhatsApp group, and it's grown to over 700 people, part of this community of learning for Yosef. And along the way, someone had the idea that if we could have a chumash, given that's dedicated to Yosef, that would encourage people to learn. Yaakov Ghatlib is the one who came up with the idea, not me, who's also involved in the project. And we thought, okay, so let's try and make this happen. So let's talk to different publishing houses and see who's the one that can help us, you know, dedicate the homage to Yosef. That's something that's pocket size, small, that everyone can use. We have a lot of soldiers also involved, so important that they would be able to keep learning as well within Yosef's family and outside of it. So we're looking for someone to donate this, someone to help us with this project, because what do we really know about printing a plumage. We spoke to different publishing places about publishing the right plumage for this project, and it happened to be that Abhishek, who's involved in Corin, was with me and Miloim, and he was able to be in the process, rather than a random person reaching out to Corin, to any other place, which is really tremendous hashgacha that they worked out that way. And in addition to that, other places were understanding, but they weren't necessarily so flexible on a practical level to make this work. There's one thing to have a really nice idea, but then when you get to the logistics and you get to the nitty gritty tails, a lot of times that's really what stops a lot of great projects. Not necessarily that people don't want to bring these ideas and do things, stuff that when they get down to the practical, they get to the practicalities, and they knew show they get stuck on small things. But Corin, to your guys credit, was incredibly and has been willing to work with us and to make it happen in a way that's really not conventional for another painting place, simply because of the ideology that drives you, which had a total understanding of what needed to be accomplished for Yosef and for his family and for Kali cell to help this be pushed forward. And, you know, it's. We try to do everything, you know, the Shin shaman, we try to do everything with really pure intentions. And this is something that, you know, I really can say that was that, you know, this project, you know, we did it for really two main reasons. The first main reason was for the sake of Yosef. The light that he brought to this world is no longer. He's not here. And by learning tarn his sake and by doing good things in his, you know, in his absence, that brings him a little bit into this world that allows him to continue to be living through us and through our actions and carrying on who he was. That's the first thing. The second thing was for the sake of his family to have, if it just any moment of Nehama, of seeing, wow, Yosef inspired so many people, which he did, and there's hundreds of people learning Torah in his memory did, gives them even a moment of, you know, Nehama, which allows you to move on from the pain of the moment and see the, you know, beauty of Yosef and who he was. And if that could be accomplished for a second, that was really our second goal. And we just saw tremendous ashgacha and Siaka Deshmayyah, and allowing this to come to fruition. And it's really just a privilege to be involved in this. That's the project, I guess, in short. [00:12:28] Speaker A: Yeah. [00:12:28] Speaker C: I mean, it's obviously a tremendous privilege for us as well. And we appreciate that you brought this to us, as you say, hash gacha for you to be with Avishai on miloum and helping Amisrah in that way as well as this way as well. In terms of what kind of response have you seen to the project from people who are part of it and to the chumashim? What was the response like from the family? Has it been? I mean, we're now, we've just sent the copies of Amidvant to press. You've had them over Shimot and Vayikra. How's that been? [00:12:59] Speaker D: It's really been tremendous. It's really been tremendous feedback of positivity both in the family and friends. We have people learning not just really all over the country of Israel, from north to south, but in the Newark area, in the UK, people all over the world texting me, can I get a chumash? Can I be involved? Can I donate? Can I help? Telling me this has changed our Shabbat stable, that now we're disrupting the parshah. And especially, you know, I can only speak for myself, but for so many people, their Shabbos tables for this last half a year have been about the war. Antisemitism have not necessarily been about the most, you know, happy topics. And sometimes I can put a, you know, a black cloud over your shabbat, and all of a sudden, you can really talk about the parsha essentials that you're talking about from the outside, the death. People in the house are actually letting the parsha and actually have questions about it and actually what to discuss about that really can change the shadow stable. So we've just got a lot of really positive feedback. And, you know, the more we hear it, you know, you invest a lot in and then you get that positive feedback that helps you, gives you fuel to keep pushing forward. [00:14:04] Speaker C: Ian, thank you so much for joining us and telling us a little bit about this really special program that's been set up to learn in memory of Yosef. And we're now going to go to our interview that we recorded just a few months ago with David Galia, Yosef's father and his brothers, to hear a little bit more about Yosef, his upbringing, his life, and his story of how he was killed saving and protecting many lives. And am Yisrael on Simchat Torah this year. Welcome to the Quorum. Podcast. And today we are joined by the Gedalia family here in our offices in Jerusalem, David and Charlie and Asha. And we're going to be hearing a little bit about the family and also about their son Yosef. So we'll go straight into it. David, why don't you introduce yourself, your sons who are here with you today, and tell us a bit about the Gedalia family. [00:15:03] Speaker A: That's a hard one. Okay. I grew up in a blend of America and Israel. I spent my early, early childhood in Jerusalem until about age four, and then I was in the states for seven years. Four in Holyoke, three in Los Angeles, and then back to Israel high school, Korev, and then back to America, Ishu University. And then back to Karan Bayavne. And then back, back to America, Yeshua University. Then I came back, I did a little bit of Hebrew and went to Barilan, did my masters in Barilan, met my wife in Barilan. We got married. We lived straight away. We lived in Jerusalem. We lived five years in Jerusalem. And then when we had three children, we moved to Beit Hamish. We've been in Beit Shemesh since. Bleh. I know we have seven children. Yosef was killed on October 7, and we can talk more about. About that day. I can tell you a lot about the family. Very proud of my family. They're amazing people, all of them. So the eldest, Shira, she's her master's in economics and works for Malag Mossadla. Sklagwa. So trying to analyze educational trends. Asher, he'll talk about himself. I'll let you introduce yourself. He's here. Yelly. Yelly not here. She can't represent herself, so we'll represent her. Nutritionalist. She's working in char aesthetic now. Charlie will introduce himself. Yosef will introduce at length. I think we'll get around to that. And then Esther and Elisheva, the two youngest two are. So Esther is doing shoot with me in Jerusalem now with a program called Darkenu. She's working with down syndrome children. And Elie Sheves, 13, working her way through high school very slowly. [00:16:57] Speaker C: Okay, I guess we'll get asher now. Age order. [00:17:00] Speaker A: Yeah. [00:17:00] Speaker F: So, hey, I'm asher. I'm 30. I studied in high school in Ogotiuda in. I went afterwards to Ely, to the machina. I was there for a year and a few months. Drafted to the army, four year service. After that, did some gym trainer course, went straight to university. After that, completed my first degree, started working in high tech, and now I'm in the middle of my second degree. [00:17:31] Speaker E: My master's, I went to Abbatistol Mitemish for high school. After that, went to yeshiva, tested Otzi on by Rabb Dokman, and I went to the army, and the saqavi actually went into army with the Shiva Tekotel. There's like ten guys who were Americans, and almost all of them ready made aliyah and now are in service with me and miloim. Right now, I'm learning my first degree in physics, and I'm also doing some dai chi. [00:18:02] Speaker A: And, yeah, you know, I was thinking about the question again, because where you are in Koran and surrounded by books. So I was thinking I should ask my boys this question, but I'll ask myself first, and I'll ask the boys a question. Which rabbinic figures or which Torah educations influenced me the most over my career? So a bit of everything, right? So, Kharev, when I went to Harv, it was not so much a datilumi school as much as a Haredi school back then, I'd say they definitely influenced me in that we learned Kumarashi Tosvot, just blood after blood after blood. I remember in 9th grade, we had tests on 40, just boom. And you expected to know all the Rashid and Tosfos. So that influenced me in one direction. Yeshiva University experience was broad. I was in Rabban Shpigashir and then Rabban Soloveitchik here, and I think the hadrat panim of Ahim Saloveyk influenced me. The shitat limur itself, how they went around the brisk learning. So I had grown up in that world. My father was a Talmud of Yoservejek, and I had felt some of that before. Branch Piegel is more in the realm of Yosem Soloveitchik's world, in just pure Gemara learning, like the way you analyze it. But Ravarn Soloveitchik did something which I haven't seen other people do, which he just read every single word. So he did not skip anything. He'd read all the Gemara and all the rashi and just go through it one line at a time. And if he was short on time, he'd just read fast. And that was one of his shitot, I think, though I was more influenced later on by a number of people. [00:19:47] Speaker F: So. [00:19:50] Speaker A: I went to Hebrew university after I got married, and I was studying neural computation, and then I met David Hansel. David Hansel was the grandson of Emmanuel Avinas. He introduced me to what he called the french methodology, which was more abstraction, of course, but also more about contextual learning and learning Gemara as it flows. He also introduced me to what he called the ashlag circle. So I started to understand a little bit of Yehuda Lebhashlag's Torah in that world, and that kind of segued into a different type of learning with Vav Suryal Weiner around Bemidrashva Ava, and there I started to learn how to listen to myself more. So I would say I definitely shifted from, in general, from 9th grade on, I did this shift from just, there is text outside of me to then there's something in the text that can be analyzed to then I can see how it reflects inside me. I'd be happy to hear your voice. Who are your influential. [00:20:54] Speaker F: Yeah, so definitely I would say in one way or in the main way, where it's not as much into the, I guess, ways of learning or how to analyze the Gemaras or what are you going to do? But more, I guess, on a higher level of what is our tafkid, what is our purpose, how do we connect to the mitzvot through the time and through where am Yisrael is situated? So I would definitely say that on one hand, and on the halachic perspective, I definitely like Rav Abaday Yosef and his shita and his way of doing halachah. So that's, for me, the two kind of sides of things. [00:21:48] Speaker E: First thing that came to mind, of course, is my father influenced me in the Gemara side learning. He'll probably share about it later, because it's a different way than what I was thrown in Yeshiva to learn Gemara. I think, again, it was more look into the text, listen to the text, hear what it has to tell you, and let's just read it and analyze it. That's Nigmara's side, I think, in the tuat, again, it's all together. But also Otzion is very Rav Dookman is all about Amisla and El Tisle and looking at things in a wider perspective with more, more, I guess, depth and also for a longer period of time and being connected to them. [00:22:37] Speaker G: I mean, this is not the first time we've had family members as guests or friends as guests in one episode of the podcast, I think as we build up to asking our fundamental question of the Torah, Al Raghadakhat. [00:22:55] Speaker A: Can you. [00:22:55] Speaker G: Tell us a bit about, you know, you mentioned your father as an influence. He definitely scores some points with that, I'm sure. But could you talk to us a bit about, you know, what was life? What was daily life like in the Gedalia household growing up? And as we begin to talk about Yosef more as his brother, as brothers, as his father, what was life like growing up daily? [00:23:20] Speaker E: Torah. [00:23:21] Speaker G: And just even thinking broadly about Torah and how he experienced Judaism obviously comes across as something very central. So what was that like growing up? [00:23:35] Speaker F: I can say from my perspective, practically, more speaking, there's, on the toa side, it's experiencing it in the house and around, you know, parents that are very involved in learning and in the shirs and all that stuff while you're in high school or in machina. So it's more just living in that environment. It's the Shabbos table, of course, where things are always being spoken. And the number one priority, and 90% of the meal is probably spent around that. Other than that, growing up in the Gedalia house involves a lot in sports and health. That's something that we like to do a lot, too. And, yeah, a lot of fun, a lot of family time, cousin time. We're very, like, family oriented kind of people. We're not. Not as much, at least. Me and Charlie, we used to call yourself Mister popular because he somehow found his friends and he'd go places with them. But me and Charlie, we kind of always just around each other and Yosef and play basketball with each other, go Frisbee, do this tournament, that kind of everything together. Not much with other friends. So, yeah, that was. That's that, I think, outlines mainly what it's like to grow up in the Ghedali house. [00:24:55] Speaker E: For me. Yeah, I agree kind of with Asher. I'm just going to point out that Yessa became Mister Poplar after me and Asher got married. So we didn't really leave him any choice. So before that, it was three of us all the time together, everything together. And we really grew up in our own. Our own, I guess you could say, environment, because we didn't feel the need for so much connection with. Outside, with friends. But also we had, like, everything we needed in our own circle. [00:25:21] Speaker A: Yeah. I try and draw a picture of what a Friday looks like, a Friday in the Godalia household. So depending on the exact configuration. But there's an element of kitchen activity, we'll call it, which is very, very dramatic. But the kitchen's open. It's right in the middle of the house. So when you're in the kitchen, you're part of most of the activities. And then there's the element of the exercise. So we have a small little gym outside which gets used on Friday by the entire family, or when they were younger, for certain. And then there's this moment, which is about five minutes to Mircha, when the boys are out in the gym and they're doing their exercises and they're all sweaty, and I say, I'm going to show. And they're all pretty good at it. But Yosef was better at this one. By the time I got to show, Yosef had showered and he was right next to me. I never really understood how he did it. And every now and then, did you use shampoo and. No. Why would be the answer. [00:26:34] Speaker C: So, obviously you mentioned him. Now, tell us a bit of introduce yourself to us a bit about his childhood and how he fits into this picture that you've painted first. [00:26:46] Speaker A: Well, Yosef is one of his characteristics that we're all familiar with, with his smile. As a little boy, when he was in school, he would just smile at the teacher. That was what he did. The teacher would ask a question, he would say, smile. And if he didn't know the answer, he'd just smile more. And the teacher would get upset and say, why are you smiling at me? And he'd just smile more. And that's what he knew how to do. He just had a smile. It was uncharacteristic and endeared him on everyone because how can you not be attentive to a smiling boy? A little thing he did, which in that little thing, and I still, of course, understand till this day is before he was three, he would just look at Aseph Torah. So he would walk up, and they did. He'd walk up to Bhima, he'd stand right in the middle, and I'd always be worried that, you know, someone would, like, bump into him. He's a little boy. And I just stare at the sefatoa, and we never knew why. We still don't know why. But for his third birthday, when we did a halacha and we built him a little around Kodesh, and that was his. His birthday gift. And he just loved looking at the sephatoma. It was a thing. His name was full name is Joseph Malachi. And there was an element of energetic beauty also just physically, but also something about him when he grew up and went to school. I mean, I never saw him do homework, but I know he did well, because he graduated. He did stop playing basketball one semester. I don't know if you know this more than me. I didn't even notice because he was so busy doing other things, but he wanted to study more. So he did take his studies seriously at some point, but it never occurred to me. So that got him through high school. Then he joined the army. He went to Machina. We can talk more about that. But the quick overview is, you know, he kept his way of living, which included going to bed early. One of the Gedalia household elements, at least for the boys, is the boys go to bed early, which precludes certain social activities, which is fine for some of us. So as an anecdote, Joseph in machine, his roommates weren't going to sleep early enough for him, so he just took his mattress and he brought it into a classroom that was empty. And he slept in the classroom because he didn't. He didn't want to disturb them, and he needed to sleep. So that's what he did. And that carried into the army, too. You know, he just did everything Benoam. Everything was done in a way that people could. You could never say no to Yosef because he never. He never created a situation which you could say no. He would do ridiculous things. And it was still. Of course. Of course. Yes. Yeah. [00:29:50] Speaker F: So for me, obviously, slightly different perspective, but same truth. So being his older brother, I'm seven years older than him. Me and Charlie used to fight more because that's kind of the age gap that you fight, or four years away. He used to try to follow me places. And then I tell him, like, why you follow him? He said, no, I'm going to play with this person, that person. He had all his excuses. Yosef, it's already seven years, so it's not as much the fighting gap. And I don't remember that much from the baby years, of course, but definitely already from age eight, nine, we have videos of it. That's when I started working out, because I kind of got into that whole thing. And I carried Josef with me from the beginning. So at the beginning, I couldn't do one pull up. So as I'm, like, trying to learn, he's also doing his first pull ups. And he was able, actually, from the beginning, but he's nine years old at that point doing it, and I'm 16. So a few years later, I'm ready, going to Machina, and then I'm already driving to the army, and he's kind of following through the whole thing and with this training and keeping up with it. And I went to Ely. He came later on to go to Ely also. So kind of have the same rabbis, a lot of the same mindset in that sense too, when it comes to serving for the country. And how do you put that together with learning and going to non religious, half religious units, together with staying completely religious and even more getting uplifted by the army and becoming more religious. The army. And the truth is both of us also ended up doing Keva. He signed, he was three and a half years in the army at Simchatoa. So really going all the way. I don't think he even had much of a debate if to sign on the extra year it was part of. He had the debate, remember, he came to me before. So how it goes into the divan where he served. You finish your training and then they send a few people to like the special pal guy, it's like the special subunit and they have to sign on an extra year usually because he was going to specialize in the drones. So he had to make that decision. I remember we debated about it a little bit. I remember I thought it was a good idea for him to do that. And he, I feel like also thought it was a good idea and that's what he did. So that's like on that aspect of, you know, just the growing up and the kind of at the end, we ended up doing a lot of the same kind of things. Yeah, more than that. We played in the same basketball team. We played together on Friday right before Singh Hattoa. We joined like a few months before. We said, yeah, let's join the basketball team. Okay, let's do it. And we both joined. He was in the army. I was like, whatever doing. We both came to be chamish, to play in the games there. We played Frisbee together for years, like ever since I was probably 20 and a bit. And he got. He was very good. We started by playing. I had actually started on Shabbat afternoons or right after show before lunch usually. That was like the main session. We'd go up to the street and we just throw. We got pretty good at it and some friend told us to go to Kifatram and we were like, whatever, we don't need that. And then we tried it out and it was amazing because it's like a flat, open grass field and you can just like, that was heaven for us. There was nothing better than food. Friday morning at Kivatram playing ultimate Frisbee. And we did that for years. Years. Like, I remember looking forward for Friday just for that. And we'd come 08:00 a.m. And until now, until a few months ago, I'd always text him are you going to Frisbee? If not, I felt like there was no reason to really go. We had our own kind of moves. We called it the Bay chemist play, the two play move. Or basically, he throws it, I throw it to him, I run the whole way, and then he just throws it to me long. And then it works usually, and when it doesn't, everyone gets mad. But we did tournaments together, so really kind of everything we spoke about, you know, I kind of had this startup I'm working on, so he wanted to join, and that's on the business aspect and kind of just mixed everything in life. There wasn't really a line between where the family and where the sports and where the activities and where the friendship and where the business goes. It's just all one vision, one big picture. [00:34:08] Speaker A: Yeah. You reminded me of a giday activity, which is Aliyah Baragil, which is about once or twice a year in the chagim. We walk from our house to the kotel, which in the beginning we did over two days, and then it took one day, and we did it in different ways. We walked, we ran, we bike rode, we did it with rocks, with little children. But it's a facet of mixing everything at the same time. It's a physical activity. It's a spiritual activity. It has Torah on the way. We walked with Alulavima. It's a national activity. It had all those facets. And Yosef started it as a little boy, and we carried him a bit. I don't know if you remember that. I remember we had to carry Yosef because it was hard for him. And then I remember towards the end, he was carrying Elishev at some point on his shoulders. It's a bit of a walk. It's like 40 km hike uphill. That was a. That's a good tradition there. [00:35:05] Speaker F: Yeah, yeah. [00:35:08] Speaker E: I'm gonna try to add in some more picture to this. So bad. Daliyad again. Yasef, I remember, would always bring the speaker, blast music the whole time, make it a lot more fun. He was always so excited to do it. Let's do it. And he always tried to get other people to join us. It's like a day before he would send out, like, tons of WhatsApps. Who's coming? Who's coming? We're going, we're going. Come, come. He's really hyped about it. And a few stories that I remember, it's like Hafayam trying to through stories. So, yes, I had his, like, way to him of. He didn't have Masahim, like, with filters. Filters, but not in a bad way with people he didn't see. Different types of people he didn't see. Oh, maybe this is something weird. Maybe I shouldn't do this. Like, two stories that come up to me. One is he went to the supermarket and bought crystal. And crystal remembers, in his, or nose is not the most high end drink. So just selling it like that, it's not so good, but it's pretty cheap. So what he did is he went to the freezer, he froze it, and then he sold as ice pops. So now he has crystal ice pops, and there he goes. And people like it. This is young, this is younger. I don't remember. I remember in high school, he might have got this from Ashoka. I remember Asha did something like that. [00:36:24] Speaker F: I also sold ice pops in 7th grade. [00:36:26] Speaker A: Yeah. [00:36:26] Speaker E: So that could have been for him. But in high school, he came up with another idea to sell toasting. So he would go buy, like, white bread, buy cheese. He would have maybe a fridge, a toaster in high school, and he would just sell his toasting cheese. He made tons of money. And you always think, okay, how can I get a bit more here? Get a bit more there? So another project we did together, he always convinced me to do all these things with him. So one of the things was collecting bottles. So for some reason, he convinced me, we're going to collect bottles. And we collected, collected, and once in two months, we would give it in and we bought things together. So it was chargeable batteries or keyboard to play games together, whatever it was. Since I had to side with him always to figure out, oh, a bit more here, a bit more there. Another fun story, um, is how you can't say no to the SM. So I. I would come home from school and it was like a month of this. I remember he would sit by the computer and start watching drone videos. This was. Must have been. This was before ten years. Like, when the drones just came out, DJI just started. No one really knew about it. Um, and, like, for a month in a row, I'd come home from school and he would show me these drone videos and hype me up about it. After a month, I'm like, hey, Charlie, you have to buy it. You have to buy it now. We're two young kids. We don't have so much money, and it costs a nice amount, but somehow he manages to give him, okay, buying this drone. So we flew to America. We bought on Amazon. We got this nice drone, and we flew it. There's like so many. So another story just comes up. We were in America, and we were playing around with our drone. We're flying it around, and it was at a time, I guess, maybe terrorism. So it was problematic flying the drone over the bridge, but okay, yes, that was to land. He goes, we go. He doesn't really, like, doesn't bother him too much. We start flying the drone, and then a policeman comes up to us, tells us, okay, no, you can't fly the drone. Bring it down. Okay, we bring it down. Then I'm like telling Yasu, yasu, let's go back, let's go back. And he was just like, smiling there, waiting, waiting. Nah, nah, it's fine, it's fine. Nah, nah, it's fine. Again, digs the drum, flies it up. And again, the policeman, I think, saw. And I'm already like, oh, my gosh, I'm in America. It's not my country. I don't know. And I think at that end, we're like, okay, we're going. And this policeman, like, followed us back home. But with that suggestive, it was like he's like, way with things, different way of doing things. So those are some fun stories. Besides that, with me and him, it was very much. I had a project, so he would help me with his project, with my project, if it was the garden. I remember one year when Sukkot, we built a wolgot together. I don't know, plant vegetables and the thing. [00:39:06] Speaker A: Planters, planters. [00:39:08] Speaker E: So we built that together. And he helped me with our BlackBerry, and he helped me with another project. And all these projects, he was always there to help me with. We do a lot of things together. I think this is also the time. Ashe already was in Yeshiva and in Ali in the army. So then me and Yosef were home. So we're more at all these projects together. [00:39:24] Speaker G: David, just as a father, it must be raising a family like this, where the boys get on so well and getting up to mischief, but only in good ways, I hope. These things like the Gadali Ala regal, this hike, where does that come from? What's the impetus for that? What's the inspiration behind her? Is it just that you're such an active family, you know, saying that, you know, the boys were enough for each other? That so much so that, like yourself, having friends made him Mister popular, whereas, you know, you guys hung out together? Is it something just occurs naturally, or was this like a real decision by yourself and your wife as parents? [00:40:12] Speaker A: That's a hard one. I think there's an element of discovery that we have in the house. So be it. Nutritional discovery to always make something different on Shabbos. But it has to be healthy, probably, unless it's not. I mean, that tradition continues. Charlie has what we call Charlie cookies and Charlie Granola, which are phenomenal. But there's an element of discovery. There's an element of living the Torah. One version of that is at the Shabbos table when the boys ask a question, or the girls, but a halacha question. So are we allowed to do the following? So we'll open up a gemara. I try not to open up a shohanaro if I can avoid it. We'll try and open up a gemara and see what the gemara says. You know, live it, see if we can make sense out of that. And I think Ali Abba regal, like you said one, is it's just natural for us to go out on a hike. That's like fun. And physical activity is fun. But also there was this element of, we're here in Aris, Israel, we're here in Yemegula, and we need to prepare. We're going to do aliyara, reggaeton, bin korbanaut. Which way are we going to walk? And from our house there are four or five different ways. Let's map them out and try them. So we've tried a whole bunch of different ways because you have to know which way to walk. And then there's a debate. We once passed the Bedouin, should we buy a sheep and carry it and see if it makes it easier or harder? We want to get arrested at the top. There were like, questions like that. But, but it was a practical thing. It's like, okay, you know, how, how are we going to do this when the time comes? And then there are the fun halakha questions that come up, like, why don't we do actually, um, bikurim today? Like Bikurim, you start by, by tying the gemmi on the first fruit as they appear. Maybe by the time the will be built by Shavuot. So we should mark out our trees. We have a pomegranate tree. We should quickly, you know, put a little rubber band on it. So it turned out it's a question people ask, do you have to actually have the Beit Hamidash to have the shot of the Qurayim in the beginning? Or you can do it first. You can first. So I think Ali Abba Regal was part of that, too, was a mixture of just living. [00:42:29] Speaker C: And he mentioned before Josef chose to go to Machina, possibly his own choice, or just following in Asher's footsteps, or maybe both. Tell us a little bit about that. His experience there, why he chose to go there. How was that for him? [00:42:48] Speaker A: Do you have any idea? I have no idea. [00:42:52] Speaker F: I think the mindset of going to elite special forces, giving yourself, giving you all for when it comes to training. And, you know, before that, we did it in workouts, and we were fully motivated. We went to Brooklyn together. We trained over there with the best street workout people in the world. Like, I was very into street workout. And one time I watched them on YouTube, and it's actually what got me into it. I was trying to learn how to do a pull up, and then I came up to one of their videos on YouTube, and I was like, hey, that's what I wanted be. And then I just worked and worked and worked. And then one time we were in America, and I told my dad, like, I really want to meet these guys. So we found one of the videos was in Tompkins Square park. So my dad brought us there, and I was like, 16, and Charlie was there and Yosef was there. And we're all there. And it's like the scene is not the most classic scene. [00:43:43] Speaker A: Yes. [00:43:43] Speaker F: We're just a jewish family in New York. [00:43:46] Speaker A: No, no, it was. Yes. Yeah, we were. Yeah. I don't know if I should describe it. It wasn't PG. [00:43:55] Speaker F: You know, whoever knows Tompkins Square park. And then we did the first session there. And then the guy over there, Rick, he's from the barbarians. I recognized him from the video. Barbarians is the group that they. That's what they call themselves. We asked him, like, how do we train with, you know, the real guys, the. The best. And then he told us, come to Wingate. I'll email you. Wingate park in Brooklyn. So on Tuesday, twelve, I think it was. I remember we came and we were like, definitely not part of the scene with the first half an hour when we were waiting for the guys to come, we were standing there. But they were very nice, all of them. Even the ones that first sight. There's nothing in common between us, but very fast, you become kind of friendly. And then we started the workout session, and we have videos from there. It's one of the best video days because everything is gold from there of Charlie trying to do a pull up and then one of the guys holding him and, like, you know, up, up. There you go, Superman. Like, you could do it. And he was. He was. What were you, like 13 or twelve or something? There's a video of Yosef, like, nine years old, and he's running from the pull ups to the dips to the push ups, and he's doing everything like, one after the other. So, like, with that in the background, like the whole, you know, military full out, not giving up. That whole mentality is very strong. And I know I went to Italy because I wanted a place that's going to prepare me the best for the army. And I can imagine that's what Yosef also wanted, also inspired by me also being in special forces. So I can imagine that was the main. [00:45:25] Speaker G: Was there ever a discussion either sort of as a father or amongst brothers and friends that, you know, making the most out of the army? Therefore, going into Dov Davan, going to special forces, these elite units, was that a desire to just be the best, or was it a desire to. [00:45:46] Speaker A: I. [00:45:46] Speaker G: Guess like a hydro mitzvah, as you said before, like, the jewish upbringing is just live it. So, you know, seeing it as like. [00:45:53] Speaker A: A. I think you have to differentiate between. It's a little bit subtle, but what they teach at David is maybe you're going to correct me, perhaps, but it's not be your best. It's serve the country the best, which is a little bit different. I was brought up more sort of ajic, risky, which is be your best, which is like, you know, fed up your own skills. God gave you strength. Develop those. This is not that. This is how can you serve the country the best? And it may be that the best way to do that is be your best, find what you're really good at, maybe not. And you do what's best for the country. So it's a different perspective, I would say, as a father. I don't think they asked me. I mean, you asked me. [00:46:41] Speaker F: I was gonna say, I remember a conversation we had when I'm in elite training and everything. And then you also, my grandfather, your father, Bupa, he also tried to convince me to be a rabbi in the army or something, because he comes from, you know, the whole Vietnam war, like, in America, where you need to be a rabbi, you're going to get drafted. Like, it's kind of the mindset and the switch obviously didn't happen as much as for us growing up here. But I remember our conversation, you telling me, like, yeah, why don't you go to some intelligence unit or something with computers, you know? And then I remember answering something around the lines of, no, I think I could do really well in combat. And you weren't, too. Of course you didn't push too hard or anything. It was just, you know, you thought that'd be a good direction, and I kind of pulled a little bit to a different direction. That was before I, you know, did any, any screaming processes yet. It was the beginning of things, but just being around the guys in elite, it helps, helped me a lot. And that was one of the reasons I went there, understand, because you see people drafting to good places and you're training with them the whole year, and then you kind of figure out where you can be, because going in there, you have no idea. Like, you hear about all these great units and you have no idea, am I even close? How do I. How do I do that? So. And I agree what you said about, you know, I think for myself, if I. If there wasn't a mandatory service, you didn't have to draft. There's. I don't. I would not draft. And once there was, I said, okay, if I'm gonna go, I might as well make the most out of it. And that's kind of how I went into things. And then in Italy, they more and more add the ideal part of, we're here to serve something bigger, and we want to take part in the responsibility of building this country. We're not going to let other people build this country and just kind of tag along. [00:48:31] Speaker C: And I guess, I mean, for those more familiar with divine and the army, a lot of what you said kind of paves a natural path in a way. But for our listeners who aren't so familiar with it, tell us a bit about that process that you went through ashore yourself, went through from being in Ailey and then making that decision. How does it work as you decide? This is the unit you want to be in. [00:48:50] Speaker A: What's the process? [00:48:52] Speaker F: So the general process, the healthiest way, because, actually, I've trained boys in the past three years to go into the army and pretty successful. The guys coming to train at me were also good guys. So it doesn't matter about how I trained them, but the main thing I say to them is, you know, the healthiest way to do it is just try to do your best and let the army kind of do what it knows how to do. Don't be too fixated on, I need to be in this unit or I need to be in that unit. Like, you can understand you want to be in combat, or you understand you have nothing to do in combat, and you'll, I don't know, maybe you're not built for it and you want to be in intelligence, but don't be too driven towards something. You don't even know what it is. You don't even know what's really good for you. And that's why for me, the process was very simple in a way, because unlike a lot of other people, which do the mistake, I didn't know much and I just knew, you know, wherever there, I want to get to the greater, greater units and I'm just going to try as hard as I can. And wherever the army puts me, it puts in the army kind of have this funnel where you come to the Yom Sayot. And that's kind of the first step towards special forces in the army. And if you complete that, you're either sent to Shayetet Matkal Gibbous or to. And then through there you navigate. If it's the Matkal Gibbush, you might get Matkal or shaldag or sheshtesha or so everything. And you don't have to think much, you just have to. When they ask you, say what you rather. And when they ask you why, you just have to give whatever reason you have and don't be too. I have to be there because that's all nonsense. Like certain units also, I've seen people getting into good units, which weren't good for them. They ended up dropping out. It was much more worse for them than getting into a more average, I guess unit, you could call it, which does very good for many people. So that's kind of my tip in a way. And also to answer the question of how it navigates, it's kind of just a flow. You go, whatever they invite you to, you do. And you find yourself in training one day. [00:50:57] Speaker A: Yeah. The funny story with Joseph there was that before you do this very physically challenging filtering process, the gibbous, he donated blood, and we were all looking at him thinking, why are you donating? Don't you think that might affect your performance just a little bit? It didn't occur to him. It wasn't like, yeah, so I heard. [00:51:16] Speaker F: From him that he went to donate blood and I understood it and then I said, okay, damage has been done, but let's not make it worse. Don't tell him, because then psychologically it's going to make it even harder. And I was trying to, you know, but then I think we told, yeah, someone told him and, and that's not good because one of the main tips for the gibbous is in your head. You have to always have it that the other person is having a harder time than you. And then if he's getting up the hill faster than you, then you know that you're not trying hard enough. And the minute in your head you might think, but wait, I donated blood, but wait, this or that, then that's. That's might break you. So. [00:51:53] Speaker A: But that was really a yosef thing to do. Yeah, it was very simple life. Like, someone comes, oh, don't eat. But sure, why not? Oh, tomorrow I have to do the most physically demanding thing in my life. Oh, okay. [00:52:06] Speaker G: If we can move forward now to, I guess, talking about Simchat Torah, I mean, where we took a length of, like, how the country was affected, and we've spoken with people from and people in the army, you know, as a family. Where were you? Where was your. How did things unfold? [00:52:27] Speaker A: I'll start perhaps with where I found myself. And then everyone can tell their story. We have a family minion, a broader clan. So we were going to join the clan Minion, and we all were in Yushalayim for Simchatra. It was the first time the family minion, normally, which took place with my grandmother's hospices, had moved to someone else's house. So I went to the minion, I guess I don't even remember when it started, but it must start at 830, something like that. Whenever it was, Yosef showed up and he was standing next to me. There was a Simon at 815. Oh, so I must have gotten there earlier. [00:53:08] Speaker F: I think it was called for eight or a chord. Eight. [00:53:12] Speaker A: Okay, so, yeah, because we got that before the sirens. First siren, I think, was eight Yosef in Duvdivan. So his life, we didn't speak much about what he did in Duvavan, but he was very, very active. We were told he was the most active soldier in the israeli army because Duv Dhavan is very active and his team was super active, and he, on his team was the most active. So he was constantly being called up to activity. So on Simchatra, he was told he needed to go to do an activity in Ayush, in Shechem, Janine, wherever it was. But he had at 12:00. So 01:00, so we were waiting for him to get called up, but we thought, okay, we'll dive in together, we'll eat, and then you go. That was like a typical type of a Shabbos activity, kind of. So at about nine ish, he started to check his phone and he saw what was happening. I think at 915 ish, 920, Yosef decided he needed to go. So his friends. It turned out he wasn't called up, but he saw what was happening, and he took it upon himself to head south. A little bit after that. Idijah's son in law, who's an officer in Givati, he got a phone call about 1030. And he went up, and then we went to eat at Charlie's house. And about 230, Charlie got a phone call and Charlie went up. And in the back of my head, we had known Asher had already gone down south. We met your wife at about ten ish. So we kind of understood what was happening. That's how we felt it from being parents. I mean, the moment that Charlie got the phone call was very difficult. That was like three boys and one son in law. Wall fighting. [00:55:01] Speaker E: Yeah. [00:55:01] Speaker F: So I woke up at eight from the siren. I was supposed to get wounded by my cousin. She lives above us at a quarter a to bring me to shul on time. And I don't know yet if it would have been lucky or if she would ever. If she wouldn't have woken me up. This could have gone many ways. But I woke up from the siren. And then first thing I did, I looked for some kind of shelter. And then I started thinking, wait a minute, what's happening? I check my phone because in my midway, in my reserve. So we get called up for things relatively fast. That's what we're supposed to do. So my phone's always on. And I looked at the WhatsApp groups, and I saw that everyone saying, come now, come now, come now, come now. And I understood. Okay, I gotta go. That together with the sirens, like, there wasn't a question. So I got in the car, I called a few friends from Jerusalem that were with me in the unit, and one of them didn't answer. The other one came with me. We drove down. We got down at around, I think, nine to base. Fastest drive I ever did. And I don't regret, like, a second of it, because every second that they counted, it's crazy. It's like the most extreme situation. And every minute really counted. So when we get to base, it's just kind of, everyone's there, you know, grab your gun, grab your bag, grab your vest. Put a grenade inside, get on a car. I grabbed a machine gun last minute. Took a few extra chains for the machine gun. I just kind of, you know, you didn't even know what you're going to. You just right before we left base, they said, by the way, like, every force that left, every task force that left before you was shot at, before they made it to where they're supposed to go. So that's when we kind of understood what's happening. But this whole day is progressing through, like, from, okay, they're shooting Jerusalem to there's rockets everywhere because we see the smoke everywhere. To I see a telegram video my friend shows me. This was that base where I really understand what's happening, where there's a soldier being dragged into a truck in Sderot. And then I'm like, okay, it's bad. You know, if they're in stdot, dragging people into trucks and they're calling us, it's pretty bad. But again, you have to understand, like, in the 99% of these kind of situations, they're pretty, I guess, like, pinpoint, localized, localized. And by the time you get there, you expect the guys that left at 08:00 a.m. Because they're on call on base would already be there. And if not them, then the imam or the police, or, like, there's so many people. But now that we all knew what happened, that was not the case in any way. So that I only understood how much it wasn't the case was when we understood they were shot at before they got everywhere. That means the terrorists are everywhere. So as we drive down, we start seeing, you know, the police kind of the checkpoints, and then. And then you just go into this kind of scene from. I don't know how to describe it better than, like, a video game of just bodies everywhere and. And the mind. Everything looks fake in a way. You understand, of course, what's happening, but it kind of. You're very, very focused, and you know what you need to do. And it turns out that Yoni Steinbelger, I think his name is Machat Nachal. So he was killed. He's maybe my second cousin or something like that. He was killed at the junction that we arrived at right after, and that's where we fought the. So I found myself ten dirty, fighting terrorists at with my own. It's called a junction over there with my guys and not thinking about anyone, really, other than, wow, I've never been so close to being dead, you know, in between. And it's a very weird feeling, like, I never felt that in my life. You know, we've done operations and stuff, but. But seeing so much death around you and just having it from so close. And our commander gets shot over there at the junction, and then we're taking it back to Mada, and we're CPR and trying to keep alive, and. And it's all kind of while you're doing the things, you're doing the things, but it's running behind you in your head, like, what is happening? Like, I can't believe this is the reality I'm living right now. But video game mode, like, everything's very technical. And I finished that day at six or 07:00 p.m. Like, we kind of just drove around everywhere. It was, you know, a day of one of a kind. And at the end of that day, I understand, like, okay, my commander died. I understand, you know, a lot of other people died that not. No one even knows yet how much because we've seen it. Like, right after that junction, we drove through where the party was. And that's when I understand that, like, another scale, like, magnitude times ten of you just see countless cars burning and fire and, like, burnt bodies and people and dead police and everything, and. And it's, like, right in front of you, and there's hundreds. And it just. There's just some kind of, like. I don't know how to describe it. All the cars are. You can just imagine how they all try to exit, and you see the terrorist cars standing there, their jeep standing on the other side with all the rpg's still in the back. And you just. The scene is playing before your eyes how it was an hour ago. We came kind of when it just got in hand. So at the end of that day, I remember I called my family and I said, I'm fine. Like, not everyone's fine, but I'm fine. And I was emotional, and it was. It was like I understood this is not a normal day, and it's the beginning of something that we don't know how it's gonna end. And the next morning, I wake up, and I understand that a friend from my Tivud was also killed. He was with another task force. Like, I knew it in the night, but in the morning, I kind of sleep on it, and then it hits me. And then the afternoon, I hear that people from Divan were killed. So I text Yosef, and only at that point, it hits me. Because until that point, I think Yosef supposed to be now in Shechem or Jennin, whatever. He's not supposed to be in this area. I remember telling my friends, yeah, I have one brother up north, Charlie, one brother in Yudavishamron, and I'm here. We're all over. And then it hits me, wait a minute. Obviously we're here. This is that kind of situation. And I text him, and he. I see like, one v. So his phone's off. So it's already not a good sign. So I call home, and at home, they don't say that he called. So I got even more worried. And then I start texting everyone from the divine, and they start answering me all these things, like, we don't know yet who's injured, who's not where, what's happening. And at that point, I understand, okay, not good, not good, not good. But we continue at that day, we ended up going up, up north. And I remember that night I didn't want to sleep because I knew the second I wake up, I wake up into the reality that I, if I rationally think about it, I kind of know what happened, and I don't want to wake up in that reality. And I remember hearing through that day rumors about Kfaraza and RPG. And then I did sleep half an hour that night. And, like, I was just having this recurring nightmare of Akfaraza and what's happening there. And the next morning, I wake up. I first go to the leviathan of my friend, like my commander that was killed in Netanyahu. And then I start heading home because I understand what's happening. And I call my cousin, who's also divine, and he tells me, yeah, look, it's not good at all. And then I'm in this situation where I don't know what to do. Am I supposed to go home? Am I supposed to go back to base and wait for my parents to call me? What am I supposed to do? So I end up managing to get in touch with the people that deliver the message to the families. And I meet them over there, and that's the first place that they actually tell me what happened, because I don't know if he's kidnapped or if he's dead or if he's really, really injured, but those are the three options. [01:02:41] Speaker G: Where are you? [01:02:44] Speaker F: In my street. That's when I understand. And that's a minute before we end up telling my parents. And a lot of the family was there, his wife, kids. So it all kind of happens together. And that's when I really let it sink in, because until then, still, I don't know if he's kidnapped. I know something bad happened. Very bad. That's what I know. [01:03:09] Speaker C: Johnny, just. [01:03:10] Speaker E: Yeah, I'll fill in the picture from my side. So we got to the davening a bit late because all the rockets that took us about leave the house. And again, we had no idea what was happening. But the people in the. In the shelter that were with us, they were on their phones, and they said, yeah, guys, it's really bad. You shouldn't go. You shouldn't go. Like, my mind's like, oh, it's fine. It's rocket. It's like, why shouldn't we go out? So we went, we left the house, and we got there, and by the time we got there, I already see didya leaving, going off, and I think I might have been maybe one of the only teenager men still around. Most of them already went home to get their phones or drafted or didn't even show up because they already were drafted. It took me a while to realize, okay, maybe I should go back and get my phone. And after, like, half an hour or 15 minutes, okay, I'm gonna go back. Just, I'm in a unit that, like, if they. If they call me, it's war. That's usually what it is. And rockets. Like, rockets, war. We had this before. I didn't, didn't, like, really didn't think about it. I went home and turned on my phone, and I see, okay, guys, repair your stuff. We might be calling you really soon. I prepare my things. I take a short nap. [01:04:18] Speaker A: I know. [01:04:18] Speaker E: Okay, I may need a rest. We won't be sleeping a lot. They still didn't call me. And by then, my parents came and we started having our meal. In the middle of the meal, ready, left after they go. And then my sister hears my phone doing a lot of beeps. They didn't call, but they sent tons of WhatsApps. And I'm like, oh, I looked. Okay, I have to go. And around 03:00 I get in the car with a friend of mine, drive up to the north, and seen driving up to the north is like every other person on the street is Milim. Like, you look right, look left. I just kept doing that. I just see the whole Kvishesh, whole Kvishad, just reserves going up to the north. They don't understand that we were racing Hezbollah. It's like, we have to get to the border first before Hezbollah can do what happened in the south. So we go, we get up to where our unit decided to be, and we get our tube, we get our guns, we get everything we need. We go into our vehicles. Not much of a vehicle. Like, much. It's more scary to be in them than out of them. [01:05:21] Speaker A: Yeah. [01:05:21] Speaker E: I think every time I get in, I start davening. I'm like, okay, if I get shot by any bullet, it's not really too much, but it's the way to move. So we get into our nag machine, and then we go to a mozav. The first mozzab we were, but it was close to the border, and that's where we were. We were there. I was. I was there. I. For now, I had no idea what was really happening. No, I knew really bad was happening. But the whole time, I was telling my guys, okay, I only want to hear good things. I want to hear good things. Don't share with me all the horrible things are happening and didn't occur to me. Like, to worry about Yossa, for my gosh, I heard he was okay, but I don't know why it didn't occur to me. But I was not easy those two days. I don't know if I had something. [01:06:00] Speaker F: To do with it. [01:06:01] Speaker E: We were there. I was there for two days. I managed to be there until Monday night. And in those two days, what we were doing was we started doing ma ravim. [01:06:10] Speaker A: So ambushes. [01:06:11] Speaker E: Ambushes. So you go down to the border, and this was at the beginning, before the border was like, you can't get close to it. The beginning. We got mamash on it, close to it. And we would just, like, take a spot, sit there for 8 hours, whatever it was, I don't remember exactly, and wait and see if they come and if they show up. And that's what we did for those two days. We. We switched between. And on Monday night, ready started heating up. So Monday night, we went to another ambush. And while I was sitting in the ambush, they saw an untet tar mutav and a missile. Yeah. Against tanks, and the tank shot above us. So it started heating up. But while I'm in the ambush, some I'm in. Pei drives by and says, goodbye, dalia, get in the car. Tells me to get in the car. And then I already realized, okay, something's not good. Like, don't just come right now while they're shooting us. Take me out of ambush. So I'm really like, oh, no. Like, I know, like, something bad happened. The question was just who? So he drives me to Yisoo babi Vime was, and we get to safe area where they can't really hit us. He got the car, and I just ask him, okay, who? Who tells me. I said, and that's how I figure it out. So I am. I'm all the way in the Teflon, like, 2 hours, two and a half hours away from everyone. And then I just try to get out of there. I have to still get my stuff from the mozave. And it's, like, under attack. So we go in fast, fast. We get out of there and I get a ride down to home. And it was a hard two hour ride because, like, you don't really want to share with the driver but you're just, like, burning inside. And then I get home and they're all waiting for me. It's really nice to them. They're all waiting for me. And that was my experience. [01:08:01] Speaker A: Well, I'll tell you some of the stuff we heard after the fact. So Yosef left, said around 930, he left Jerusalem. He went to Maale Adumim, which is where his base is. He picked up some equipment and at this stage of the game, there was no organized unit heading out. So he and another friend, guy and two other people, but from other subunits. So the divan is divided into these subunits. So one of his friends from his subunit, who they specialize in drone warfare joined him. But two other people from the divan, not from his subunit, joined him. The four of them go south. They get the Kfar Azad, about ten, 3011. What had happened in Croaz, it turns out, I know all the details, of course, was the Matkal guys had gone in first. I think they had suffered losses. There were casualties there. The divan went in after them. They suffered from casualties. And now Yosef's team arrives and at first they arrive, I think there are four semi armored vehicles. They're called davids, lightweight jeeps that are armored. And they came in and they evacuate the first group of wounded and dead. So that was the first activity. Then Yosef's team go back, goes back in. Now, at this stage, there were, after the fact, it turns out maybe hundreds, more than 100 terrorists walking around Quasa. Three out of the four vehicles are non functioning. So it wasn't like they just walked in, drove up, picked up their stuff. They walked in, they get shot at. Three vehicles aren't functioning anymore but one vehicle is Yosef's vehicle. So Yosef, guy, Nachman and or go back in and they're moving from east to west, working their way through Coraza. So the second time they go in, they live it farther west. And now they come into an area where there's an injured civilian and some other injured people. They evacuate those injured and the civilians. There's a video of it if you really want to see. And then Duchess, civilian recovered fully but he was critically injured at the time. And they evacuate him. They take him out and they apply first aid. Then they go back in a third time, the third time they go back in again. They're the only vehicle that's entering deep into Khraza. And now they've moved farther west. At the far western side there's what was known as the Kvar Noir, the youth hostel area, which is like two rows of little low houses. And in these houses are terrorists and civilians that are being either they were kidnapped or hostages, one of both. So they went down at first, down the middle of them. So they have left and to the left and to the right they have these houses and they're firing from their vehicle and killing the terrorists and trying to save the civilians. They finish a round of going in between the two rows of houses and they come out again to the farther west side. Now they're coming down the houses where on their right, on the western side is the fence that leaves Caraza, and on the left they have the houses. And as they're pulling up into the house, they get hit by an RPG. So it seems the RPG didn't explode, but it did ignite the fuel tank, we think, and the vehicle goes on fire. The four of them managed to get out of the vehicle. So the two in the back, Josef and guy were in the back. They suffer from smoke and burns. They jump out of the vehicle. The two in the front get out from the front door and they find themselves semi protected because they're against the wall of the construction of the house above their head. There's a civilian in Mahmud who's saying that there are terrorists in her house. So the scene is there's a vehicle on fire. There are two soldiers adjacent to a building above their head of civilian. Inside that house are terrorists, Yosef and his friend guy. When they get out of the vehicle, they get out farther west on the western side of the vehicle. Immediately as they get out, they throw a grenade at them. So they have to split up. They dive together, they head farther west and the second grenade is thrown. And guy goes north and Yosef goes west, talking about 1020ft this way or that way. And that's the last we hear of Yosef being alive. So Guy called out for Yosef and they can't find him. The story is long, but it's all under fire between the RPG's and the constant weaponry or also gets killed at that junction. Plus minus guy and Nachman, the survivors from that vehicle, they are evacuated. Maybe a half hour later, about 3 hours later, more Dubdevan people show up. A friend of Josef Rodriguez puts up a drone and he spots Josef's body face down, but outside the fence. So now it seems they had been dragging. The terrorists had been dragging his body out. He recognizes Yosef's body. So again, you have to appreciate, Natasha can tell you that the terrorists were wearing israeli uniforms. At times it wasn't clear who's who, but Yosef always wore succeed. And they reckon they find. And he also, his vest had a special pouch for batteries for the drones. And they recognize him. So they send the Golani team to get them. The Golani gets there and there are two terrorists trying to drag his body to Aza. They kill the terrorists, they recover the body and they bring them back. That was 7 October, quite a terrible day. [01:13:39] Speaker D: The. [01:13:42] Speaker G: Sorry you spoke of Josef. As you know, the thing you mentioned is his smile that he both annoyed but charmed his teachers with his smile, that he was happy, charming, mischievous. After October 7, Simchat Torah, what's been the thing that you focus on more, you know, as a nation, as Jews around the world, whether in Israel or in the diaspora, it is very difficult to focus on just one person, one name. The numbers have been overwhelming. As a family, as his friends, what's been the thing that you will come back to about yourself? I don't use the word legacy, but what's the enduring memory? What's the thing that. [01:14:48] Speaker F: I'd say brotherhood first in a way. You have the pasuka, the chayanochima Vakashi, who Yosef says to his when he's looking for his brothers. And to me, that kind of sums up so many things about this story because Yosef's team, what they wrote about him in his basic training, we were able to see what everyone thought about Yosef. And it was like every single person said, yosef's always there first for you and then for himself. He's always worrying about everyone. He'll help you with what you need to do, even if he's going to get in trouble for not doing his own job. And that's one side of it. And then on the day itself, Yosef doesn't think about himself in any point of the way. He just goes to the most dangerous place where the truth needs to be told. Many soldiers were in the area and not many soldiers had the courage to do what Yosef and those three guys did, which is to go into where the terrorists were, while there's civilians there, where the chances of coming out alive are not high. It's just not high. Like you can understand what you're doing. Definitely after 3 hours of being there and being sprayed at bullets and everything he's seen and experienced throughout that day until that point. So also until that point and everything also that led up to this point, because one of the things that we know that made Hamas and Sinwal make the decision to do the attack is they saw there is a terror in the nation. There is, you know, there is a whole mess about the reform or whatever. And, you know, people are saying, don't serve in the army. And people are saying, don't do me ruin. And people are saying all this kind of stuff and seeing what it thinks. And this is stuff I'm saying based on what Shabak interrogate terrorists that came in here and what's been told on the news, that he assumes that he can break us apart completely by attacking us at this weak point. It's like Amalek, it's literally what he thought he could do. And that's part of the, in a way, to me, because before that, the brothers were not united. And we have this one brother that cares for us. He's coming to take care of us. He sent out there and afterwards we're coming together and we're understanding. Wait a minute. No, actually, unity is the number one priority. And that, to me, I think, answers your question of, like, the legacy of Yosef is brotherhood first. I think it's something that also crosses through religious, not religious. Like, it's just, it's just jewish israeli base. The most basic, basic thing that connects us all throughout all the spectrums. And that to me is something that I'm trying to get the message out that there's, and it's, it applies right now because we have people that are being, you know, they're hostages. Like, I'm lying down in bed last night and I'm just not comfortable thinking about it that, like, I'm dead tired, I'm a little cold or whatever and I'm under a blanket. And there's people that this is their daily number, I don't know, 100. What, that they're doing this. And I'm just not comfortable. And I feel like every jew around the world has to feel that and think, what am I not doing enough? Because it is not. We're all, we're all one. There isn't, we can't sell one brother to Egypt and live happily here or to Gaza and whatever. And if it comes to understanding, I don't think enough people understand, definitely probably not outside Israel, that we are in an existential threat. We were always in a central threat. We just didn't know it until October 7. Many of us didn't know it since Imchato. Many more of us know it, but still not enough know it after maybe the next war, the one after that may be coming up very soon, even more people will know it, right? So we're in an existential threat, and it's come the only way for it to actually apply meaning the only way, I believe our existence will be threatened completely and is if we're not united. That's the bottom line. And everyone understands that. And we see that also from the days of Tanakh. And like I met yesterday, she was like, she came out in the news lately because she said that she regrets all her hateful kind of speech or things that she said that weren't, like, in line with united and brotherhood. Even though we disagree, at least we're brothers first thing. And one thing she said, she said she kept now for Chavez's straight. And the reason for her getting more religious is because she literally feels like we're living a chapter in the Tanakh. She's saying, like, in Ahav's days, they did not fight and there was peace, and they were strong empires. In Judea and Israel, they were both strong empires. And we had days of big Tzadikim who were learning Torah, who were doing what a lot of communities now think they need to be doing, which is not unity. It's maybe other jewish customs. And that is not enough. What God wants us to do, number one, is not speak lashon hara about each other and not fight with each other. And then he'll deal with us later if, you know, if we're still not good. But that's the basics of the basics. So that's, I guess, the message. And it comes twofold, I guess, because, one, it's for what Yosef and what he stood for, and two, it's for that Yosef, I guess not being here now won't be just for nothing, because we're just going to have more wars if this continues, and they're only going to be worse. People think that we're past the worst of it. We're really not past the worst of it. In many, many ways. This can play out. [01:20:23] Speaker E: Yeah. I want to just fill in a few points. I agree with last year, a few stories to really show how this was Yosef. So we mentioned this before, but also his friends noticed it. But Yosef really didn't have separation between people. Like, he didn't see a person and look at him in a certain way because he was dressed in a certain way. He had friends from all you could say, gvanim from all types. Types. I don't know, because he really saw the inside. He saw the. He saw who you are. He connected. And he had this way to see the good in everyone and everything as a story. Also to show another thing about how he was all about Nola Shenar no al khilut when he was in the army. And they would sit together, the unit. So once he would feel, okay, this is not really going where I want to go. So he would get up and say, sorry, guys, but this is not going to make the beta Midas come any faster. And he would get up and walk away. And I double checked this, because it's really crazy sentence to come and tell your guys in the unit also, like, what? They're going to look at you funny. But also, he didn't have that problem. He really lived what he believed. And this also connects to what we said about Daliya Leger. My memory also for Darigo is very simple. Also, I guess I believe this way. Our simplicity is, what do we want? What's our chazon? Where are we heading to? And when you look out, like, when you look in the broader perspective and you look in the perspective, am Yisrael and Qlal, I think, yes, have lived to its fullest. He wouldn't sleep for Amisla. He would work extremely hard. He would jump shabbos out. And for him, it was very simple. Like, his friends at some point was like, hey, maybe we won't do this activity. Maybe we won't do the next one. But for him, it was like, no, this is important. We're saving lives. We're helping up. We're saving people. For him, it was simple. It was Qalisrael, it was Amisrail. And for him, the chazon of we're going one step closer to Beit Hamidash. That was another saying of his, or another saying was, sprintle Beit Hamikdash. We're gonna take a sprint for Beit Hamikdash. Like, he really knew what he wanted and where he was going, where he was heading. And his whole being was for Ami. His whole being was for Qal Israel. That's who he was. And he didn't see the differences. He only saw Hadoot. He only saw the Kalal. Another thing I wanted to say, but I forgot. [01:23:04] Speaker A: What are the challenges we personally faced, which embodies this? Is this. Push me, pull you from the national tragedy to the private tragedy. And what Charlie's describing is that Josef lived at both levels, seamlessly. I don't know that it's really hard to communicate what it looks like to have somebody in your house who doesn't really have that private space thing going for him. He's really just. I mean, one of my clear memories of him on Shabbat is Shabbos afternoon. He refused to take a nap. It was like he didn't sleep all week. Literally hours, very few hours, because he was busy saving lives. And then Shabbos afternoon, he and his wife would sit on the couch. He would learn from. We learned Masachet Shabbat, and just the two of them sitting next to each other on the couch and just being together was a very. Just a beautiful thing to see. There was nothing, I think, part of why, now that I'm reflecting on, like, part of what was so beautiful about it was how there was no private goal like Yosef and Sinai. They weren't being individuals. They were just being a couple. It was a beautiful thing. [01:24:29] Speaker E: And also, I want to share that. It's really some magical thing he managed to do is jump between the identities. You would say, like, even in the most crazy time for getting shot at. And every. Every single night when he would come home, and he would always try to get back to. If it was like we had something in sukkot, I know he didn't sleep the night before, and he called me. He's like, oh, maybe you're. Your father in law is kind of. You can drive me, draw me. He always tried to get places and do things, even though if he's dead tired, it wasn't was an issue for him. He was like, okay, I'll sleep 2 hours, and I'll go be with the family. He had, like, values, really strong values of being the family. And when he was with us, we. We felt him with us, like, we didn't feel him in a different place. He was with us 100%. And in this time, I didn't feel like, oh, he's too busy in the army. No, he always showed up. We came by, took cookies, laughed, made him granola. Like he was all interaction was there. And he really managed somehow to live a whole life. I don't know how else to describe it. [01:25:28] Speaker C: So you painted a picture before in terms of the house growing up, obviously, with Torah influences, and that central part that Torah played as a whole family. Also in your individual journeys through Henan and in the army, David, you mentioned before in terms of just now, about yourself's commitment to learning parsha with Shnai mikra. Tell us a little bit about that and this project that we've been. We've had here at Corian, we've had the privilege to have a little bit of an involvement in. [01:26:02] Speaker F: Again, I think it's a pretty basic. I know that at some point, I understood that it's something that you need to do. It's not like an extra. You know, if you're extra good and you have extra time, then do it like it's brought down in the Shulchan and Bucha thing. So. So it's like, okay, if I'm gonna learn something, first, I'll learn what I need to do anyways, and then I'll learn more things after that. So in the army also, you don't always have the most time to learn. Yosef was very good at making extra time and finding time, but the minimum, at least, is on Shabbat, in between and when you have a book and in the army to do the shnimikra. So he definitely kept to that. He definitely put that as a priority and made sure it happened every week, no matter what kind of week he had. [01:26:53] Speaker A: The language of the Gemara, the language of the Shohanar. I'm sure you're familiar with this. All is forever. One should always complete Yashlim, complete the parshiot with the community. It's not that you're required to learn. Doesn't say like, no, it's Yashlim Parshiotav Imatzibur. It's a very unique type of learning because it's a community learning. So I think on that, it's talking, reflecting back on the things we said before that for Yosef, that's very suitable to do community learning. It's not about private learning. Just be part of the community. Wasn't so hard for him. That was a magical thing. With Yosef, things are. I don't know how often you've tried to do Pamai Mika Vatagum. It may not be the easiest thing for everyone to do, but for Yosef, just why not? [01:27:51] Speaker G: So, previously, we've asked this question at the beginning of the episode, but we felt appropriate today to wait until the end. Can you teach us the whole Torah al Ragallachat? Whether it's your own, whether it's what Yosef's Torah would be? [01:28:13] Speaker F: Please. [01:28:15] Speaker A: Okay. I came prepared with one idea. Now that you're saying it, I had a whole other one. Gee, I'm torn. I'll take two. Can I take two? Is that fair enough? [01:28:28] Speaker E: Two answers? [01:28:29] Speaker A: Okay. We can make pretend one of my answers is for all of us. So I'll start with my second answer. My second answer, teach me the tarot and regula. So there are three stories there with Shamai and Hilal. That's, I think, the third one. The first or the second one is the geR, the person he comes to Shemai, he says, how many Torat are there? And Shammai says, two. So he says, teach me. Convert me, on condition that you teach me one of them. Only one. Torah Shiba, not Torah Shabbat. Shammai kicks him out. Then he goes to Hilal, same thing. The two Torah convert me if there's only one. So Hillel says, sure, no problem. And on the first day, they do alef bet, gimer giml. Wonderful. He comes back on the second day. Hillel points to the aliph, he goes, that's a gimel. Points to the bel, he goes, that's a dalad. Points to the Giml, goes, that's an alif, the garrison. Wait a minute. Yesterday you said other way around. He goes, wait, you believe me from yesterday? Oh, so there has to be a Torah too. I think that story that captures the junction between Torah Shabaktav and Torah Shabbat Pei. And I think one of my answers teach me the whole Torah, is that if you're learning Torah and it's external from you, it says Torah Shabbat. It's written down. It can exist WithoUt you interpreting it. That's not torah. That's not being JewIsh. Being JewISH is WheN the Torah and Tosha, of which I take literally to mean my mouth, speaking those words, like I'm living those words. Then you can have a toesh bachtav. You can't have a toesh bakhtab if you don't live it. So I'm going to project that to Yosef as being. Maybe. Maybe he would answer that. I don't know. It's a sophisticated answer, but he was a deep thinker. But he wouldn't have to say it. He would just live it, right? He wouldn't actually. He wouldn't have to say it. You look at him and you go, oh, I get it. [01:30:39] Speaker F: So I think what I said before about it and Yosef's personality of first, the other, and then him, relates really well to this question. Because at the end of the day, that's literally Vavdada Racha mocha. Like it's the kyum of it. In the most literal sense. It's maybe even more than that. It's like, or something. So that's kind of interesting to point out that that that was Yosef, how I explained it a few sentences ago. I think if you ask me in my day to day, like, where do I feel like this is what God wants of me in the world? This is the Torah. [01:31:15] Speaker A: This is the. [01:31:16] Speaker F: You know, I think Kiddush Hashem to me is the mitzvah, the Torah, the everything. You know, Khilur Hashem is the biggest of er. And there's no, as the Ramam says, and, kid, hashem would be the opposite of that. And I think it just encapsulates all the different sides of things, of being someone who attracts more people to the Torah and more people to the truth and the connection and not the opposite. So because I feel like all the learning and all the everything, and at the end of the day, if you're not able to do Kedush Hashem with that, then you're definitely wrong somewhere. If people are going around and they don't like you, and you're not able to get anyone to feel any more connected or to see any good in it, then it's all not true. Nothing there is happening. So that's where I would put it. [01:32:19] Speaker E: Yeah. When I was thinking of the question before thinking, I think more out of connect to Yasa. But I want to go to the back to what we were talking about beforehand of Kralisrael. So there's a famous thing where we know that the Rambam din limnot eret Israel is one of the mitzvahs. And they asked, how can that be? And that answer that I heard, I think give was the el tissue mitzvah. It's such an obvious mitzvah, they don't even have to leave no to say it. So I think for like Torah, you have to understand that the Torah thing is, if we think the Torah as a personal thing, a private thing, then we don't understand it at all. It's not another dat or another cut. It's when we say toa, we think in the terms of Kralisa, in terms of when also we know in the Torah, you can't actually, as an individual, do all the mitzvahs. You have mitzvahs that only koanim could do. You have mitzvahs only Navim could do, only slay could do. The only way for us to really is as a unity as a whole, as something. And so thinking of Torah as something that you can do. And I'm gonna be a bit harsh outside Israel, I think Yasaburagumi cannot. It doesn't work. When we think of a Torah, it's something that we do as an am, something we do in Israel. It's a misfah mitzvahel. And only in Israel we can even start talking about it. Only in Israel we could even access the Torah. Like we know the Ramban says that outside Israel, the mitzvah does a tzivudachtziunim. It's only so we remember. So when we come to Israel, we could even come and do the mitzvahs. I think also the think about the Torah of Krali salamisa. That's really the haduta. Asha is trying to say how it's so important we have these three together, the Ahadut, Amisrah, and Israel and Tawa together. But in a broader aspect, in the qlais aspect, I think, yes, I've lived really his whole entire life. And that, for me, I think, paints the bigger picture. [01:34:27] Speaker F: I want to, like, in a way, add to Charlie and in a way connected to what I said before, and maybe also give it a little different angle towards people that don't obviously relate to that or feel that to be true. Obviously, we had, in the times of the Gemara are some of our biggest Rabbanim and people we look up to, people that didn't live in Israel, and we know that Torah grew out of Israel. But I just think to connect it to what I said before about the Knesset member and living the chapter in the Tanakh, I guess in one sentence you could just say like, you don't want to be out of that chapter. You don't want to be sitting aside watching that chapter happen. You want to at least be in that chapter and maybe even be the good side of the story. Right? We have people in Israel that might see. They might look back in history and be like, I guess we were on the wrong side of history, but at least they were in history. You don't want to be sitting out of history. And when history is playing out through our eyes, it's just, you want to be part of it. [01:35:32] Speaker A: And we can edit this out the next bit here. But it's a little bit of tar, which I think is. Because, again, you asked, connecting to Parsha Ashavur, connecting to Shnai Mikra, connecting to actual Rashi. So my Torah would be a little cliche like, but the pasug shema Yisrael hashem alokin hashem ahad. So there's a machlokit how to interpret that. There's a rashi and a ramba. So Rashi says, hashem shuhu elokenu huyye echad, as in, right now it's not one. Right now we have Hashem alkenu. And what does that mean? Shah is going to be that Malhot Alokenu is midatpe of relationship we have with God, which is perhaps imposed upon us. Whatever we want to say now, we have that relationship in the future, like it says last week's parasha. So then also the shemishalem. Yadr kesya mel hamab amlek dora door. So God's name, which is the yud and the hey, will become complete when Amalek is destroyed. Bim, rabbi. Amen. As we speak, we're working on that. And then hashem Ahad. So that's what Rashi says. So God's name will be complete when the rambam has a different perspective. The rambam, he numerates the two mitzvah to the mitzvah of Kabrat, or Mohot shamayim, the mitzvah of Ahdut hashem. But they come together in the word echad. So the Rambam reads apostle Shemay Sal. Hashem Lochinu as a prefix. Hashem Echad is where everything comes together. The Ahtut exists now. God is one now. And recognizing that is the definition of Kabrat al Mukha Maim. It's not that Hashem Alokenu is the Kabrat al Mukha Mayim. Hashem Ahad is a future activity, as Rashi explains. It's that Hashem al Khad, that's everything. And I think that kind of relates to what Charlie and Asher saying here, that living tachat or Muhuthamaim is living in Ahdut. And that hits you in many different ways. It's with Yosef and his wife on the couch and Shabbos learning, just being together. It's the Ahtut of the family. It's the ahtut of Amisrah. It's the Ahtut of Eisral together with Amisrah. Yes. My Torah alone, in that sense, is. It resonates with this ahtut that's present today, and we've experienced it over the last couple of months. [01:38:15] Speaker C: David, Asha, Charlie, it's been a real privilege for us to have a chance to sit down with you. Obviously, we've got a picture in terms of the Gedalia house and the family and the Torah that you shared and the Torah that you learned and told us about. I think really we could see the importance and understanding about what it means to really take that, to internalize it, to live it. And I think that's something that really, personally, I found, I think is something that Josef certainly encapsulated to really embody that with his whole self, with his life. And thank you just so much for joining us and for sharing, telling us a bit about yourself. [01:39:04] Speaker A: Thank you. Thank you. [01:39:06] Speaker B: That's what we've got time for this week. We're back in a couple of weeks with more Torah Al Raghalachat. Thank you so much again to Ian Schwartz and to Dave Godalia and family for joining us and telling us so much about Yosef, their son, their brother, their friend, who he was, and the legacy he's left behind. If you'd like to be in touch with us about anything you've heard on this episode of the current podcast, you can reach us via email, podcastorinpub.com or on all social media at corinpublishers. Please make sure to follow us wherever you're listening. Give us a rating and subscribe as well. You can get 10% off your next order from crimepub.com using print premo code. Podcast at checkout wishing everyone a meaningful Yom Hazikaran and a chag atmot Samach. Until next time, this has been the Koran podcast.

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